EGYPT: FATHER VERDOSCIA (MISSIONARY), COUNTRY “IN A CRITICAL PERIOD

11:21 – EGYPT: FATHER VERDOSCIA (MISSIONARY), COUNTRY “IN A CRITICAL PERIOD”  

“We are in a critical period, because we do not know where the stalemate in which we are will take us. Protesting voices can no longer be heard as loud as a few months ago, there are no leading voices in the January revolution, and the voices of the Salafites and the Muslim Brothers are no so loud any more”. This was stated by the Comboni missionary, father Luciano Verdoscia, who has been at Cairo for about 20 years, as he commented the situation in Egypt in an interview with SIR. The low profile taken at this stage by the Salafites and above all by the Muslim Brothers, with some of its leaders opening to laicism and political and religious pluralism, according to the missionary, “arouses suspicions about what they must be scheming. There are associations that have a significant structure and political organisation, grown under Mubarak’s regime. The population is on the alert, because it is against the extreme positions of the Salafites and the Muslim Brothers”. (continued)

 

11:22 – EGYPT: FATHER VERDOSCIA (MISSIONARY), COUNTRY “IN A CRITICAL PERIOD” (2)

 

Another worrying fact “is the lack of any true leadership among the young people who stirred the revolution a few months ago. For young people, this is weak point in the run-up to voting”. A positive sign is the request of democratisation made by many Muslim intellectuals who “acknowledge the need to laicise the country and ask that Egypt be turned from a political-confessional country into a lay country. There are lots of committees and circles of politicians and intellectuals who are advocating this idea on the media. Of course – father Verdoscia argues –, good intentions are one thing, facts and effective decisions are quite another “. On their part, Christians keep asking that “the country be democratised and the new leaders’ awareness be raised about the protection and respect of human rights, justice and freedom. We are glad to see such open-mindedness in so many Islamic religious leaders and intellectuals about a lay state, but let’s keep watching unless the opposite takes place. A religious government is not democratic. Egyptians – he concludes – are a peaceful people who only asks to live in democracy and social justice”.

 

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